Step-by-Step Thai Tea Recipe

Konnichi wa / Great Outdoors

Introduction

Thai tea is traditionally made with Thai black tea, sugar, and condensed milk. This is the kind with bold flavor that you might enjoy with Thai food at a local Thai restaurant in the United States or while traveling through southeast Asia, but there are many variations of this recipe that you can try out! For example, some recipes call for a mixture of both black and green tea leaves or adding spices like cinnamon sticks or star anise to the mix. Others call for ice cubes for a classic Thai Iced Tea (or Cha Yen). The options are endless when it comes to brewing up your own unique blend of this perfect beverage.

Watch this video for how to make Thai Tea

Ingredients

Thai black tea leaves (or a Thai tea mix of both black and green).

Water - about six cups per cup of Thai tea leaves, but varies depending on the type and how strong you like it.

Sugar to taste, usually anywhere from one tablespoon for those who enjoy their drinks very sweet to two tablespoons for those with a more mild palette.

Condensed milk, sweetened condensed milk, coconut milk, heavy cream, or whole milk as desired. The consistency will depend largely on personal preference: if using condensed milk, add just enough so that it can be stirred in easily; use less when using coconut cream. You'll need an equal amount of liquid whether you're making your own or buying pre-made canned varieties. If adding spices (cinnamon sticks, star anise, cardamom pods), add them at this point.

Instructions

Boil the water in a pot or kettle - once it begins to boil, you'll need to wait until the bubbles are gone before adding tea leaves (remember that more boiling water will be added later)

Add desired amount of sugar and stir well as it dissolves into the hot liquid

Turn off heat source and allow tea mixture to cool down for about one hour - your stovetop should have cooled enough by now. Stir occasionally while waiting so no solids settle on bottom of pan - Bring back up to high heat, then turn off again when bubbling starts happening (you can also start with cold water if you want to speed up the process).

Add desired number of tea leaves and water while stirring well. Bring back up to heat, then turn off again when bubbling starts happening (again, you can use cold water if this is your preference). Strain tea leaves with a fine mesh strainer or other filter (some use a coffee filter) and pour mixture into a glass.

Stir in condensed milk or coconut cream with a spoon until combined well and bright orange - enjoy hot or room temperature!

This Thai tea recipe will make about six cups worth of tasty beverage and takes about two hours from start to finish. You'll need an equal amount of liquid whether you're making your own or buying pre-made Thai tea mixtures from a tea shop. If adding spices (cinnamon sticks, star anise, cardamom pods), add them at this point before bringing it all together by heating everything for the second time. You can also use cold water for the first boil to speed things up a bit, if desired.

Once you've let it cool down for about an hour (or used cold water), bring everything back up to high heat and then turn off again when bubbling starts happening - stir in condensed milk or coconut cream with a spoon until combined well before enjoying hot!

Tips & Tricks

Thai black tea can be found at grocery stores, but is often more expensive than green tea. If you want to save a few bucks or prefer the taste of fresh leaves for your drink, go with that

You don't have to use only condensed milk when it comes to adding extra creaminess - coconut creams are also delicious and contain less fat if desired! Since their consistency is thicker (almost like pudding) start by using just enough so they're easily stirred in; keep those proportions same as when making this recipe from scratch

Thai Tea has been enjoyed since the 1800s and often served alongside sweet treats such as waffles and pancakes. A sugar syrup may also be poured over after steeping for an added touch of sweetness or to make the drink more robust.

Adding condiments such as cinnamon sticks, star anise and cardamom pods are a delicious addition for those who enjoy their morning drinks on the sweeter side!

It is essential that you boil water before adding tea leaves because they will turn bitter if boiled too long. You'll need six cups of water per cup of tea leaves, but it can vary depending on what type you're using (black vs green) and how strong the flavor should be; usually anywhere from one tablespoon sugar for those who like theirs very sweet up to two tablespoons sugar for people with mild tastes in beverages. Remember not to stir until all bubbles have gone down so it won't get diluted by boiling hot water. Add the desired amount of sugar, stir well as it dissolves into the hot liquid (if using a pot on your stovetop), and then turn off heat source to allow tea mixture to cool down for about one hour - your stovetop should have cooled enough by now. Stir occasionally while waiting so no solids settle on bottom of pan; you can also start with cold water if you want to speed up the process.

Once it has been cooled down again, bring back up to high heat before turning off once bubbling starts happening - this will be much quicker than when starting from scratch! Use an equal amount of water whether making homemade or buying canned varieties and add condiments like cinnamon sticks, star anise and cardamom pods before bringing everything together.

The tea will be delicious hot or cold so feel free to try it both ways! Enjoy with whatever you prefer like pancakes, waffles and ice cream for a dessert type of morning meal; might also enjoy this with toast if you're in the mood for something savory instead. You can even make your own by adding green leaves to hot water (or black) without boiling beforehand - let steep according to taste preferences before straining out solids left behind for an authentic Thai Tea experience which is often enjoyed alongside sweet treats such as waffles and pancakes. A sugar syrup may also be poured over after steeping for added sweetness/to make it more robust.

Variations

Replace the condensed milk with coconut cream to add extra richness and a different flavor

If you like your drinks sweeter, use more sugar or replace it altogether by infusing honey into boiling water before adding tea leaves - can also be added after steeping for an even stronger sweet taste

Add cinnamon sticks, star anise and cardamom pods for a warm spicy touch! These are often used in Thai Tea blends and might go well with those who enjoy their mornings on the sweeter side.

Note: This is just one recipe of many variations that you may find in Thailand; this particular version uses traditional black tea but green tea could also be substituted if desired. Those who need caffeine should avoid decaffeinated varieties if they want the full effect.

FAQs

How do I get the perfect consistency?

The best way to make sure your Thai Tea is just how you like it is by practicing. Keep in mind that some people prefer their drinks more diluted while others may enjoy a stronger tea taste; this will depend on how much sugar and water you add before boiling or steeping. Some find it easier to keep an equal ratio for every cup they're making instead of adjusting proportions as needed so be aware that all recipes are based on six cups of water per one size cup (or less) with two tablespoons of sugar added at first, but feel free to adjust according to preference!

What type should I use when thinking about flavor preferences?

Black vs green varieties often offer different tastes. Those who enjoy the strong flavor of black tea may want to stay with that variety while those who prefer a more mild taste might choose green tea instead.

What are some ingredients I can use?

Traditional Thai Tea is brewed from black leaves but you can also make it using green varieties if desired - these will be boiled first and then steeped in hot water before adding any other condiments like cinnamon sticks, star anise or cardamom pods for added warmth and spice! You could add condensed milk for extra richness or honey (infused into boiling water) as a substitute if preferred; experiment by replacing this ingredient entirely with sugar syrup which adds sweetness/to makes things stronger. You should always remember not to stir until all bubbles have disappeared from the top of the tea.

What are some examples?

Some people enjoy this drink alongside waffles or pancakes as a morning meal, while others prefer it for breakfast in bed with toast and jam! You can also pair Thai Tea with desserts such as those that include syrup (waffles) or ice cream/gelato to make things sweeter; but be sure not to overdo it on sugar if you're feeling sensitive after drinking something so rich already. You could even try using less water than normal when making your own by adding green leaves directly into hot water without boiling beforehand - let steep according to taste preferences before straining out solids left behind for an authentic experience which is often enjoyed alongside sweet treats like waffles and pancakes, as well.

What are the health benefits?

Those who drink this tea may find they have a stronger immune system than those without it - Thai Tea contains antioxidants which help protect against cell damage or even cancer in some cases! This is also why many enjoy drinking it alongside sweet treats such as waffles with syrup for breakfast; studies show that sugar helps balance out any negative effects of caffeine on your body like increased heart rate/blood pressure or anxiety if you're sensitive to stimulants. It's always important to watch how much you consume while pregnant because these teas do contain caffeine but still provides enough nutritional value (like iron) so make sure not to overdo things by adding too much at once! Ultimately this drink is a great way to start your day and will provide you with the energy needed for whatever tasks might come up during the rest of it.

How do I make Thai Tea?

Please see above, but as a recap: to make this drink, create six cups worth of boiling water and then add two tablespoons sugar into each cup before stirring until fully dissolved - those who need caffeine should avoid adding decaffeinated varieties if they want the full effect! Once these are ready, wait around ten minutes (or longer) before removing tea leaves from pot or infuser in order to let them cool down enough so that we can strain out any solids left behind once cooled. Garnish as desired such as by using cinnamon sticks, star anise or cardamom pods which can be boiled first for a stronger flavor or if you're using green tea, then steeped in hot water and removed before adding anything else.

How do I avoid caffeine?

If you want to avoid caffeine completely, try honey instead by infusing it into boiling water which will be added directly to the pot/infuser without any further steps! You'll also notice that there's no need for milk when making your own because this drink is already quite rich on its own - however feel free to adjust according to preference as those who would like more sweetness should ask for condensed milk (or other alternatives) with their order at restaurants. For those sensitive to stimulants due to health concerns such as heart rate issues or anxiety, always remember not too overdo things by adding too much at once. So if you're feeling sensitive after drinking something so rich already, then try using less water than normal when making your own by adding green leaves directly into hot water without boiling beforehand - let steep according to taste preferences before straining out solids left behind for an authentic experience which is often enjoyed alongside sweet treats like waffles and pancakes.

Final Thoughts on Thai Tea

“The mountains are calling and I must go.”

— John Muir

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Konnichi wa / Great Outdoors